Thursday, August 14, 2008

How to Conduct Politics as Catholics. Abp. Chaput's Denver Memorandum

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A book by American archbishop Chaput is making a stir ahead of the presidential elections, against those who want to water down the faith or remove it from the public sphere. Chaput's book has also elicited strong interest in Rome.

The Archbishop of Denver is one of the premier leaders not only of the Church in America but in the world. His fidelity to the faith, clarity of conviction and inspired leadership have made the Denver Archdiocese one of the premier Sees in America. His latest book book is a blueprint for the exercise of Faithful Catholic citizenship.
The Archbishop of Denver is one of the premier leaders not only of the Church in America but in the world. His fidelity to the faith, clarity of conviction and inspired leadership have made the Denver Archdiocese one of the premier Sees in America. His latest book book is a blueprint for the exercise of Faithful Catholic citizenship.
ROMA (Chiesa) - A few days ago, a book was released in the United States that will be widely discussed, especially in the run-up to the presidential elections. The author is Charles J. Chaput, archbishop of Denver.

Chaput, 64, born to a farming family in Kansas, is a member of the Native American tribe of the Prairie Band Potawatomi. He is a Franciscan, of the Capuchin order. Before going to Denver, he was bishop of Rapid City in South Dakota. He is among the candidates for two top-level archdioceses waiting for new archbishops: New York and Chicago.

The title of the book itself gives a hint to its contents: "Render Unto Caesar. Serving the Nation by Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life." It is right to give Caesar what belongs to him. But one serves the nation by living out one's own Catholic faith in political life.

Chaput moves decisively against the prevailing cultural tide in the media, in the universities, among political activists, a tide that wants to thrust the faith from the public stage.

But he is also issuing a challenge to the American Catholic community. There are 69 million Catholics in the United States, one fourth of the population. More than 150 congressmen say they are Catholic. In the Senate, the Catholics are one out of four. They are the majority on the Supreme Court. But, the author of the book asks, what difference do they make?

Among the American bishops, Chaput is one of the most decisive in taking clear positions on abortion, the death penalty, immigration. In the controversy over giving communion to "pro-choice" Catholic politicians, he maintains that those who ignore the Church's teaching on abortion are no longer in communion with the faith. They separate themselves from the community of the faithful. And therefore, if they take Eucharistic communion, they commit an act of dishonesty.

In the United States, this controversy remains highly charged. The latest flare-up was set off last April, when during the Masses with the pope on his visits to Washington and New York, the "pro-choice" Catholics Nancy Pelosi, John Kerry, Ted Kennedy, and Rudolph Giuliani received communion.

But Chaput's book goes much deeper. It urges Catholics to live their faith to the full, without compromise. If American Catholics are going through a crisis of faith, of mission, and of leadership – he writes – the task of overcoming this belongs to all, to the faithful as to the bishops.

And this task has repercussions for the entire world. American Catholics cannot tolerate it if the United States exports violence, greed, and disdain for human life. They must work actively to bring their nation back to being a beacon of civilization, of religious harmony, of freedom, of respect for the person.

Chaput's book has also elicited strong interest in Rome. The same day on which it came out in the bookstores, August 12, "L'Osservatore Romano" dedicated an extensive review to it, written by Robert Imbelli, a priest of the archdiocese of New York and a professor of theology at Boston College. Chiesa- Sandro Magister

Magister, acknowledged as one of Italy's most informed lay experts on the Vatican and its doings, usually has his facts together. He mentions Archbishop Chaput as being a possible replacement for one of two cardinals. Cardinal George of Chicago is only 71. Cardinal Egan of New York is already 76 and waiting for a replacement so he can retire. One wonders if Cardinal George has recurring health problems. He suffered from bladder cancer in 2006. Does Magister know something that we here in the U.S. are not aware of?
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